BurgerRodeo

just a kid writing about burgers

Archive for the category “Chat”

Andy Warhol eats a hamburger

4 minutes and 28 seconds of your life that you’ll never get back.

 

Hipster Menu

The “burger that’s crazier than it needs to be, w/fries” looks like a deal at $19.

Is it blasphemy to say In-N-Out is a religious experience?

According to this article on Buzzfeed, In-N-Out is a religious experience.

27 Reasons In-N-Out Is Actually Heaven On Earth

This must be the “Cheeseburger in Paradise” Jimmy Buffett was singing about.

In-N-Out

1. First of all, the burgers, which are handmade by angels.

2. Also, the heavenly, freshly cut-to-order, divine fries.

3. When the burger and fries come together on a tray, you can hear a choir of angels singing in the distance.

more…

But like the article says, “If you’re not in California, Nevada, Arizona, Utah, or Texas, you’re out of luck.”

Hmmm… I wonder where I’m going to take my summer vacation this year? Hint: Probably somewhere with In-N-Out.

Please follow @BurgerRodeo on twitter.

Eatin’ hamburgers in Iran

Maybe we can avoid wars by eating burgers together?

Tehran foodies flock to American-style burger joints

TEHRAN — At the Garage Grill in an upscale Tehran neighborhood, classic rock plays from the speakers, and photos of Paul Newman, James Dean and hot rods line the walls. It could be an old-time American diner, except that its hamburger prices reflect a wealthier target market here.

Right next door, Dukkan Burger serves its fare on butcher paper, with plenty of Heinz ketchup and French’s mustard supplied on request. The clientele includes young women clutching designer purses, arriving with their dates in European luxury cars.

Greasy burger joints have been part of Tehran’s fast-food landscape for decades, even in the years just after the 1979 Islamic revolution, when any symbol of U.S. culture was denounced as an example of “Westoxification.” Those eateries were mostly in downtown working-class neighborhoods, serving laborers in need of a blast of calories or students watching their budgets.

Now, though, high-end burger restaurants are suddenly popping up across the city, making the gut-busting American institution — and the quest for the best burger — the latest trend in Tehran dining.

Facebook pages dedicated to local hamburger outlets debate their relative merits, comparing them to McDonald’s, In-N-Out, Burger King and other U.S. chains. That fascination with brands has resulted in such blatant rip-offs as McAli’s, Superstar — conspicuously similar in appearance to Carl’s Jr. — and even a place calling itself Five Guys.

After a string of restaurants catering to Tehran’s rich opened and closed in recent years, observers of the capital’s culinary scene say the rise of the quality burger is not surprising, especially given Iranians’ love of grilled meat.

“Burgers are very simple. It’s a promise that’s easy to deliver on,” said Payam Kashani-Nejad, the founder of Gumboo Guide, a Web site devoted to reviews of Tehran restaurants. “And it’s a big market.”

David Yaghoobi, until recently creative director at a top Iranian advertising agency and now based in London, noted that the burger, while well-known here, is still somewhat exotic, boosting its appeal.

“In Iran, most things foreign are considered high-end, and as a burger is considered foreign, maybe there is some of that, too,” he said.

It is no coincidence, then, that most of the new hamburger restaurants are in the affluent neighborhoods of northern Tehran, in the foothills of the snowcapped Alborz Mountains — places such as Niavaran, where Garage Grill and Dukkan could dare to open side by side.

“Our concept is purely American,” said Arash Farhadpour-Shirazi, co-owner of Garage Grill. “Burgers and cars.”

The young male servers at Garage Grill wear T-shirts from a classic-car rally that the restaurant sponsored last year. A neon Route 66 sign hangs in the front door above the back half of a classic Austin Mini. The car’s front half and the front of an orange BMW 2002 double as the restaurant’s grills.

“It’s a short escape into a different environment,” Farhadpour-Shirazi said. “Iranians love the American style. The grass is greener in the U.S.”

In nearby Farmanieh, the most popular of Tehran’s new burger joints, Burgerland, was opened last year by the members of the Iranian underground band Barobax.

In 2010, Barobax produced the biggest domestic music hit in recent memory, the wedding staple “Soosan Khanoom.” But the group members say they started Burgerland because there is more money in the food business than in playing music.

Fans line up to take photos with them, but they deny that is the main reason Burgerland is perpetually packed.

“Maybe the first and second time people come it’s to see us, but if they didn’t like the food, they wouldn’t come again and again,” said Khashayar Moradi Haghgoo, who owns and runs the restaurant with his bandmates and cousins, Keivan Moradi Haghgoo and Hamid Forouzmand. He said Burgerland regularly sells 1,500 hamburgers a day, more than three times the output of most eateries included in this report.

Across town, in the western neighborhood of Shahrak-e Gharb, BurgerHouse sees itself as the pioneer of Tehran’s hamburger craze. In business for three years, owner Amir Javadi said no one else was selling quality burgers in the city when he opened, and then “this year, all of a sudden, burger joints started sprouting like mushrooms.”

BurgerHouse started as strictly takeout and delivery but accidentally became Tehran’s lone drive-in restaurant.

“We noticed that people would pick up their orders and then just sit in their cars and eat,” Javadi said. “There are extra costs for delivery, like the packaging, so we started giving the option of bringing trays to customers’ cars, and people got used to it.”

Every night, even during the freezing winter, the narrow street that is home to BurgerHouse is lined with cars of regulars waiting for their order numbers to appear on a screen above the tiny shop front.

To Javadi, the success of burgers in Tehran is unconnected to any particular cultural trends or preferences beyond the simple pleasures of the food itself.

“No one looks at a burger as something American or even foreign anymore,” Javadi said. “It’s one of the world’s favorite foods.”

http://www.washingtonpost.com/world/middle_east/tehran-foodies-flock-to-american-style-burger-joints/2014/01/04/7c984fbc-6986-11e3-997b-9213b17dac97_story.html

Jet and Chord McCoy back on the Amazing Race

As you know, I love burgers and I love rodeo. So I’m really excited to see Jet and Chord McCoy back on the Amazing Race for the All-Star season starting in February 2014. I might even create a Jet & Chord burger in their honor. (I’ll probably serve that on a French bay-get.)

Virginia students vote for pink slime burgers, not pure beef

What is wrong with these kids? I suppose if the only burgers that you eat at home are McDonalds and Burger King then you will never appreciate what a good healthy burger tastes like.

Kids’ beef with all-beef burgers prompts school to bring back the processed meat

Virginia school district brings back 26-ingredient burger after students complain about the taste and look of all-beef patties.

Photo: Valeriy Lebedev/Shutterstock

Kids in Fairfax, Va., have demanded their additives and chemicals, and it looks like they are going to get them. According to a recent story in the Washington Post, Fairfax County Public Schools are pulling all-beef burgers from school lunch menus and replacing them with processed meat after heeding complaints from students.

It all started during the 2011-12 school year, when a Fairfax-based advocacy group called Real Food for Kids released a report showing that the school district’s burgers contained 26 ingredients, including a number of additives and preservatives. Parents were outraged, and the processed burgers were replaced with all-beef patties. But at the start of this school year, the school district quietly returned to the processed patty, citing kids’ complaints about the all-beef burger as their reasoning.

In a note to Real Food for Kids, Penny McConnell, Fairfax schools’ food and nutritional service director, wrote that “students are our customers and we listen to them and implement their requests if possible.”

OK, I get that. But what are the schools going to do if the students complain that math is too hard? Or that they don’t want to learn how to spell? Wouldn’t it have been better to try another option — such as switching all-beef burger suppliers or working with the kids to address their concerns, rather than taking a step backward and bringing back the burger that’s chock full of chemicals?

Parents, school officials, and health care providers are supposed to be working together to help kids lead a healthier lifestyle. What does it teach kids when their school officials bring back what is essentially junk food just because the kids say it taste better? Should they switch back to potato chips because those are more popular with students than vegetables?

http://www.mnn.com/food/healthy-eating/blogs/kids-beef-with-all-beef-burgers-prompts-school-to-bring-back-the-processed

British restaurant cooks 6lbs 6oz burger

VIDEO: Britain’s biggest burger cooked in Plymouth

A BURGER believed to be the biggest in Britain has been cooked in Plymouth.

Weighing in at 25lbs or more than 11 kilograms with bun, cheese and salad, the monster meal boasts a mind-blowing 25,000 calories.

The giant burger is weighed.

The beefburger, about 20 inches in diameter, contains as much meat as 50 normal portions.

It took more than two hours to cook in an oven because no frying pan was big enough.

The burger was dressed with about two kilograms of cheese, about 20 sliced tomatoes and 500 grams of salad leaves. The buns were specially baked.

It stands as high as a tall pint glass.

VIDEO:

http://bcove.me/ee4i26jh

The burger was made to celebrate the first birthday of JD’s Grill at Derrys Cross in the city centre.

Owner Dave Cossar said the biggest burger they could find which had been previously cooked in Britain weighed in at 6lbs 6oz.

He said it would be sliced up and shared by family members and regular customers.

Dave added: “It is a monster. It is not bulked up with anything. It is absolutely 100 per cent pure beef, with a herbs and seasoning.”

Chef patron Justin Meaney and staff at the American-themed restaurant did a trial run a couple of weeks ago to make sure the meal was feasible.

It took two of them to carry the record-breaking burger from the kitchen to the restaurant.

But the restaurant has some way to go before their beat the world record – the heaviest burger ever made weighed in at more than a ton in a casino in Minnesota last year.

http://www.plymouthherald.co.uk/VIDEO-Britain-s-biggest-burger-cooked-Plymouth/story-19735292-detail/story.html

Five Guys and Shake Shack Come to London

Congrats, London!

Stuff I love to do

Move aside afternoon tea obsession – there’s a new mania in town – and it likes BURGERS.

Yes, in the past week I have side-stepped my sweet tooth and fallen for the meaty, meaty taste of the trendy burger joint.

More socially acceptable than McDonald’s, and cooler than a hipster with a beard, riding a tandem bike (yes, this picture exists), a new breed of burger bar has taken over London in a flurry of rosemary salted chips and cajun flavourings.

And, like all pointless crazes, it has caught me in its barbeque-glazed yummy trap.

From Patty and Bun to Dirty Burger, new burger joints have been popping up everywhere, and like I said, are the latest trend to have hit the capital.

So, just for you, and in the style of a fat kid eating their feelings, I have made my way through London’s new meat-and-bun based joints…

View original post 1,377 more words

World’s first “test tube burger” costs $332,000

Yuck!

I do not want to eat fake meat from a laboratory.

First taste of test-tube burger declared ‘close to meat’

The world’s first lab-grown burger is seen after it was cooked at a launch event in West London.

(Reuters) – The world’s first laboratory-grown beef burger was flipped out of a petri dish and into a frying pan on Monday, with food tasters declaring it tasted “close to meat”.

Grown in-vitro from cattle stem cells at a cost of 250,000 euros ($332,000), the burger was cooked and eaten in front of television cameras to gain the greatest media coverage for the culmination of a five-year science experiment.

Resembling a standard circular-shaped red meat patty, it was created by knitting together 20,000 strands of laboratory-grown protein, combined with other ingredients normally used in burgers, such as salt, breadcrumbs and egg powder. Red beet juice and saffron were added to give it colour.

Professor Mark Post holds the world’s first lab-grown beef burger.

The two food tasters were reserved in their judgement, perhaps keen not to offend their host at the London event, noting the burger’s “absence of fat”.

Pressed for a more detailed description of the flavour, food writer Josh Schonwald said the cultured beef had an “animal protein cake” like quality to it, adding that he would like to try it with some of the extras often served with traditional burgers – salt, pepper, ketchup and jalepenos.

Even the scientist behind the burger’s creation, vascular biologist Mark Post of Maastricht University in the Netherlands, was relatively muted in his praise of its flavour.

“It’s a very good start,” he told the hundreds of reporters who had gathered to watch the meat being cooked and served.

The Dutch scientist’s aim was to show the world that in the future meat will not necessarily have to come from the environmentally and economically costly rearing and slaughtering of millions of animals.

“Current meat production is at its maximum – we need to come up with an alternative,” he said.

Yuck!

MASSIVE SCALE

The World Health Organization (WHO) says meat production is projected to rise to 376 million tonnes by 2030 from 218 million tonnes annually in 1997-1999, and demand from a growing world population is expected to rise beyond that.

According to a 2006 report by the U.N. Food and Agriculture Organization (FAO), industrialised agriculture contributes on a “massive scale” to climate change, air pollution, land degradation, energy use, deforestation and biodiversity decline.

The meat industry contributes about 18 percent of global greenhouse gas emissions, a proportion expected to grow as consumers in fast-developing countries such as China and India eat more meat, the report said.

Chris Mason, a professor of regenerative medicine at University College London, who was not involved in the research, said it was “great pioneering science” with the potential to ease environmental, health and animal welfare problems.

But, he added: “whilst the science looks achievable, the scalable manufacturing will require new game-changing innovation”.

Post said he was confident his concept can be scaled up to offer a viable alternative to animal meat production, but said it may be another 20 years before lab-grown meat appears on supermarket shelves.

He also conceded that the flavour of his meat must be improved if it is to become a popular choice.

Josh Schonwold, a US based food writer, tastes the world’s first lab-grown beef burger.

Post resisted requests from journalists from all over the world eager to try a morsel of the world’s first cultured beef burger, saying there was not enough to go around.

Instead, he said, his children would be offered the leftovers.

($1 = 0.7528 euros)

This is how to write a #foodblog

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